It is taking longer than expected to fetch the next song to play. The music should be playing soon. If you get tired of waiting, you can try reloading your browser.


Please check our Help page for information about troubleshooting Pandora on your browser.

Please ensure you are using the latest Flash Player.


If you are unable or do not wish to upgrade your Flash Player,
please try a different browser.


Please check our Help page for information about troubleshooting Pandora on your browser.
Your Pandora Plus subscription will expire shortly.
More Info
No Thanks
Your Pandora Plus trial will expire shortly.
Restore
Close
close
Your Pandora Plus trial subscription will expire shortly. Upgrade to continue unlimited, ad-free listening.
Upgrade Now
You've listened to hours of Pandora this month. Consider upgrading to Pandora Plus.
More Info
No Thanks
Close
Hi . Pandora is using Facebook to personalize your experience. Learn MoreNo Thanks
 Upgrade  sign up   |   help   |  
-0:00
0:00
Change Skin

Free personalized radio that
plays the music you love

Now Playing
Music Feed
My Profile
Create a Station
People who also like this
Also listening to:

Curtis Gordon

One of the most enduring and beloved rockabilly artists of the '50s, Curtis Gordon has never gotten the recognition he deserves as a true crossover artist between country, Western swing, and rockabilly. A devotee of both Ernest Tubb and Bob Wills as a boy, it's possible to hear echoes of Tubb's "Walkin' the Floor Over You" in his best sides, including "Play the Music Louder," "Caffeine and Nicotine," and "Baby, Please Come Home," indeed, the steel player in his '50s band, Freddie Calhoun, played for all the world like Tubb's steel guitarist Jerry Byrd. Gordon grew up listening to Tubb and Wills on the radio, as well as old records by Jimmie Rodgers and quickly developed his own aspirations as a singer, winning a local radio talent show. He left school as a teenager to front a band -- whose membership included a young Jimmy Bryant, then a fiddle-player using the moniker Ivy J. Bryant -- until his parents insisted he give it up. Being stuck in school didn't dampen Gordon's enthusiasm for music or a performing career, however, and he continued working with a Gulfport, MS, outfit called Pee Wee Mills & the Twilight Cowboys. At the age of 21, he put together his own Western swing band and worked the area around the Georgia-Florida border. The band was good enough to earn a living of sorts, and in June of 1952, they entered a contest in Atlanta and ended up catching the ear of a local RCA Victor executive, who brought them to the attention of Steve Sholes, the head of A&R for the label's country division. They were signed that summer and had their first recording session in the fall of 1952, which focused principally on ballads. By 1953, however, Gordon was recording a few swinging, harder numbers such as "Rompin' & Stompin'," interspersed between the ballads and novelty tunes. His sound was a unique amalgam of styles like honky tonk and Western swing -- equal parts Hank Thompson and Ernest Tubb -- all grafted to a freer, looser, more vibrant singing style, a decade more youthful than Tubb's style. Gordon got steady work touring the Grand Ole Opry, playing support to Ernest Tubb or Hank Snow, and he was making a living, if not setting the world on fire. His RCA sides sold just well enough to keep him with the label for two full years, generating new records every few months, but music was changing around Gordon and Sholes faster than either could keep up with it, and none of his country-style singles generated enough interest or sales to chart. Gordon's potential seemed solid enough, however, that immediately upon parting company with RCA Victor, he was signed up by Mercury Records. Gordon's Mercury recordings were very different from his RCA sides, principally because the label let him cut a large number of originals, and because his Mercury contract coincided with rock & roll's rise to national prominence -- the latter event was heralded, ironically enough, by a subsequent Steve Sholes signing to RCA, one Elvis Presley, with whom Gordon had shared the bill several times while playing shows in the south during 1954 and 1955. Gordon's March 1956 sessions showed just how much the excitement surrounding Presley in the South, even before he'd broken nationally, had opened the way for him. Those recording dates, and the ones that followed in December of that year and October of 1957, showed Gordon plunging into the new music with total abandon and astonishing results. His country ballads were good enough, well-written, and performed with passion, and in another reality he might've been a serious rival to Lefty Frizzell. But when he turned to what they used to call "rhythm numbers," Gordon was spellbinding -- his youthful, exciting and engaging singing style, and the tightness of his band's playing all combined to generate brilliant records that seemed to straddle the gap between rock & roll, Western swing, and country music, without treading on the essentials of any of them. He should have been huge, appealing across generational lines to country listeners and their children and to the Ernest Tubb crowd, and to the kids listening to Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins.

Alas, he never charted a record, despite a lot of tries working with producer Pappy Daily and some of the best session musicians in the business working behind him and his band. A stint in the Army (during which he crossed paths with a young would-be singer/songwriter named Roger Miller, whom he later helped get a contract) probably didn't help, but more broadly, Gordon never managed to be in the right place with the right record at the right moment. Gordon made a decent living playing locally in Mobile, where he had a solid and very loyal audience and where he also owned a very popular club. He also toured occasionally around the Southern and border states. His last long-term recording contract was with Dollie Records in the late '50s, but he never stopped performing and he made a good living, even if he didn't get rich doing it. Gordon saw some of his songs do well, particularly "I've Aged Twenty Years in Five," which was recorded by George Jones. He was concentrating mainly on running his successful dance club in Georgia, but resumed performing in the '80s largely as a result of his discovery of new demand out of Europe for his classic songs, where rockabilly music had acquired a large and fiercely devoted audience. He remains a revered figure in rockabilly as one of its great elder statesmen, and his music still appeals just as easily to fans of honky tonk and Western swing. ~ Bruce Eder
full bio

Selected Discography

x

Track List: Got A Light, Mac?

2. Smoke, Smoke, Smoke That Cigarette

3. Cigarette Blues

5. The Old Clay Pipe

6. Cigarette And A Silhouette

7. Don't Smoke In Bed

8. Two Cigarettes In The Dark

9. Smoke Rings

10. Smoke Dreams Of You

12. Caffeine And Nicotine

16. Give Me A Chaw Tobacco

17. To-Bac-A-Wa

18. Cigareets & Whuskey & Wild, Wild Women

x

Track List: Rockin' Bones: 1950's Punk & Rockabilly

Disc 1

1. Rockin' Bones

2. Let's Go Baby

3. Baby Let's Play House

4. Little Girl

5. Cat Man

6. Lobo Jones

7. Juvenile Delinquent

8. Froggy Went A Courting

9. Rattlesnake Daddy

10. Down On The Farm

11. Rockin' In The Graveyard

12. Dancing Doll

13. Long Blond Hair, Red Rose Lips

14. Action Packed

15. Boppin' High School Baby

16. Believe What You Say

17. Sunglasses After Dark

18. Rumble

19. Down The Line

20. Pink Cadillac

21. Black Cadillac

22. Who's Been Here

23. I Need A Man

24. Please Give Me Something

25. Sinners

Disc 2

1. Rock Around With Ollie Vee

2. Lou Lou

3. Rock Crazy Baby

4. Love Bug Crawl

5. Fool I Am

6. Red Hot

7. Love Me

8. She's My Witch

9. Lordy Hoody

10. Bloodshot

11. Trouble

12. Hot Shot

13. Long Gone Daddy

14. Curfew

15. Put Your Cat Clothes On

16. Pink And Black

17. Domino

18. Jungle Rock

19. Ubangi Stomp

20. Chicken Walk

21. Chicken Rock

22. Eeny-Meeny-Miney-Moe

23. Shirley Lee

24. Woman Love

25. One Night Of Sin

Disc 3

1. Blue Suede Shoes

2. Duck Tail

3. Stack-A-Records

4. Daddy-O Rock

5. Move

6. Brand New Cadillac

7. Rumble Rock

8. Hep Cat

9. Cast Iron Arm

10. Switch Blade Sam

11. Ballin' Keen

12. Sweet Rockin' Baby

13. Get Rhythm

14. Rock Billy Boogie

15. Crazy Baby

16. Susie-Q

17. Worried 'bout You Baby

18. I Love My Baby

19. Come On Little Mama

20. Whistle Bait

21. Spin The Bottle

22. Bertha Lou

23. Real Gone Daddy

24. My Pink Cadillac

25. Draggin'

Disc 4

1. Action Packed

3. Who Do You Love

4. Summertime Blues

5. The Way I Walk

6. Wild Wild Women

8. Get Hot Or Go Home

9. Swamp Gal

10. Miss Pearl

11. Mercy

12. Rock Boppin' Baby

13. Rockin' Daddy

14. Rock It

16. Flyin' Saucers Rock 'n' Roll

17. Shake Um Up Rock

18. Red Hot Rockin Blues

19. Bang Bang

20. One Hand Loose

21. Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On

22. Fujiyama Mama

23. I Got A Rocket In My Pocket

24. Oh Love

25. School Of Rock 'n Roll

26. Rock-N-Bones

Comments

Don't have a Pandora account? Sign up

We're sorry, but a browser plugin or firewall may be preventing Pandora from loading.

In order to use Pandora internet radio, please upgrade to a more current browser.

Please check our Help page for more information.

It looks like your browser does not support modern SSL/TLS. Please upgrade your browser.

If you need help, please email: pandora-support@pandora.com.

In order to use Pandora internet radio, please upgrade to a more current browser
or install a newer version of Flash (v.10 or later).

In order to use Pandora internet radio, please install Adobe Flash (v.10 or later).

[106, 112, 104, 66, 96, 80, 84, 69, 68, 68, 122, 65, 122, 120, 105, 86, 74, 64, 99, 86, 72, 123, 110, 92, 91, 124, 79, 64, 90, 102, 91, 91, 76, 118, 69, 116, 96, 75, 94, 70, 69, 101, 77, 95, 64, 120, 77, 96, 67, 91, 77, 102, 114, 105, 80, 89, 97, 83, 93, 124, 77, 125, 68, 80, 114, 99, 105, 66, 77, 100, 105, 68, 94, 123, 107, 111, 68, 114, 103, 82, 84, 99, 120, 119, 76, 100, 86, 84, 110, 89, 125, 75, 115, 95, 121, 102, 112, 104, 99, 97, 122, 123, 73, 64, 90, 109, 113, 71, 69, 76, 66, 69, 98, 123, 123, 88, 106, 65, 108, 76, 115, 77, 72, 127, 72, 97, 92, 98, 118, 110, 114, 71, 69, 75, 117, 98, 122, 126, 109, 89, 117, 94, 72, 96, 94, 73, 103, 108, 121, 101, 95, 69, 99, 110, 112, 127, 116, 70, 97, 72, 69, 95, 89, 88, 105, 101, 73, 108, 106, 97, 74, 83, 125, 117, 102, 113, 105, 76, 66, 124, 121, 100, 79, 124, 110, 84, 68, 93, 122, 85, 85, 65, 85, 113, 83, 67, 102, 94, 104, 83, 70, 124, 112, 84, 100, 101, 115, 86, 76, 83, 124, 74, 103, 87, 78, 70, 76, 73, 112, 76, 97, 73, 94, 104, 96, 99, 74, 119, 112, 116, 113, 81, 120, 126, 102, 84, 127, 69, 87, 78, 88, 101, 116, 70, 111, 126, 101, 71, 120, 74, 83, 106, 113, 124, 88, 78, 92, 78, 119, 125, 118, 89, 81, 100, 92, 114, 107, 111, 71, 109, 106, 86, 75, 84, 123, 125, 84, 87, 71, 94, 70, 75, 84, 106, 107, 106, 127, 86, 92, 82, 70, 106, 106, 123, 96, 78, 69, 100, 83, 89, 120, 101, 100, 118, 100, 72, 91, 108, 96, 69, 97, 94, 98, 98, 90, 67, 84, 109, 105, 82, 93, 100, 89, 119, 102, 114, 110, 117, 67, 115, 83, 112, 76, 89, 120, 77, 65, 96, 99, 82, 69, 105, 100, 125, 101, 121, 117, 76, 113, 84, 78, 120, 119, 125, 82, 112, 80, 106, 78, 73, 81, 71, 94, 73, 77, 118, 69, 87, 105, 93, 124, 94, 79, 74, 96, 93, 94, 96, 107, 93, 102, 112, 104, 82, 71, 86, 71, 80, 94, 120, 79, 76, 64, 113, 99, 78, 121, 86, 115, 118, 87, 96, 118, 94, 124, 116, 92, 123, 103, 103, 64, 85, 126, 126, 84, 74, 113, 89, 112, 105, 85, 96, 122, 96, 64, 100, 100, 86, 66, 74, 100, 101, 124, 107, 106, 79, 110, 93, 75, 125, 119, 97, 86, 106, 83, 69, 91, 115, 92, 92, 65, 67, 102, 77, 127, 117, 121, 100, 114, 81, 95, 122, 81, 123, 69, 64, 80, 104, 126, 73, 111, 110, 121, 102, 81, 97, 101, 88, 110, 106, 76, 64, 66, 64, 77, 65, 95, 121, 122, 72, 117, 116, 119, 102, 122, 89, 71, 116, 104, 74, 106, 118, 92, 76, 97, 126, 80, 72, 79, 64, 79, 117]