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Junior Byles

One of Jamaica's most tragic figures, Junior Byles was also one of the island's greatest root stars. His vocals were quite unique, and although his soft, almost husky voice would never ring from the rafters nor give voice to anger, the gentle timbre still expressed deep emotions. His was the voice of the meek and was all the stronger for it. The closest comparison is perhaps with the vulnerable tones of Slim Smith, but while the former Unique made his mark with love songs, Byles would speak not for the lovelorn, but for the oppressed. The two men did share another link, however, both suffered from serious psychological problems that in one case ended one man's career and left the other in ruins. Kerrie "Junior" Byles was born in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1948. He was still in his teens when he formed the Versatiles with fellow vocalists Earl Dudley and Louis Davis. It was the height of the rocksteady era and vocal trios ruled the land. The Versatiles were just one of many hopefuls at the auditions for the Festival Song Contest in 1967, each desperate to catch the eye of the producers who stalked the contest in search of new talent. The trio was proud of their entry, an upbeat Byles' composed celebration of unity, "The Time Has Come." The infectious song and the trio's obvious enthusiasm caught the attention of Joe Gibbs, who brought the group into the studio. At the time, Lee Perry was working as Gibb's chief engineer, and thus oversaw the Versatiles' first recordings, including their festival entry. Perry left in a huff over production credits soon after, and his assistant, the young Niney Holness, took over. The trio continued to cut singles exclusively for Gibbs over the next two years, but not in the prolific numbers of many of their bigger counterparts. But quality made up for quantity; gorgeous songs like "Just Can't Win," driving religious numbers such as "Trust the Book," and the party piece call and response of "Long Long Time" all cemented their reputation. The group also excelled at writing catchy hooks, as they proved with their debut single and confirmed with "Push It In," one of the most infectious and rudest songs in their repertoire. The Versatiles rode the rocksteady wave into the new reggae era, and as the decade waned, they left Gibbs and linked again with Perry. They cut a handful of singles for him, including such hits as "Children Get Ready" and the harmony drenched "Teardrops Falling." From there, they joined forces with Duke Reid, for whom they recorded the delicate "I Love You Baby." The trio also had a brief encounter with Laurel Aitken before reuniting with both Gibbs and then Perry. The session with Perry was to be their last, and the bandmembers went their separate ways in 1970. Byles joined the Jonestown's fire department, but continued working with Perry. Before the year was out, the pair had cut his debut solo single, "What's the World Coming To," which was given the full orchestral treatment by Tony Hartley in London.

In a way, Byles served the same function for the producer as Max Romeo did for Holness, giving voice to Perry's most radical roots visions. The pair attempted to subvert the 1971 Song Festival with their entry "Rub Up Festival '71," which actually reached one of the final heats. It was only when Jamaican radio complained about the innuendo-laced lyrics that the judges took notice and disqualified the song. The pair got their own back the following year, when they took the less-objectionable "Festival Da Da" to second place in the contest. 1972 was a momentous year in Jamaica's history, an election was scheduled, where for the first time the leftwing opposition People's National Party (PNP) (headed by Michael Manley) looked likely to take control. It was a heady, if difficult, time and many of the island's artists were making their political preferences known, Byles and Perry included. The pair recorded a number of seminal songs across late 1971 and into 1972, all of which spoke directly to the current political clime. The haunting "A Place Called Africa," is one of the loveliest repatriation songs ever recorded; the biting "Pharaoh Hiding," a nursery rhyme taunt aimed at the ruling Jamaican Labour Party's (JLP) leader Hugh Shearer; "Joshua's Desire," putting Manley's vision of a better world into song (his supporters referred to him as Joshua); and the most radical of all, "Beat Down Babylon," a perfect blend of Byles' infectious melody and Perry's production effects, including a cracking whip sound to accompany the chorus' "whip them, whip them Lord." However, in the hothouse of Jamaican politics, the population occasionally wants a breath of fresh air, and it blew in with Byles' "Fever," his biggest hit of the year, and one of Perry's most masterful productions. 1973 brought Byles' debut album, Beat Down Babylon, a dread masterpiece and instant classic. The album remains one the best from the era, notable not just for Byles excellent songwriting and delivery, but for Perry's exceptional production, and it stands to this day as his most coherent album. Byles followed through with a stream of equally powerful singles. His best work was with Perry (although the singer would also record with other producers on occasion), and the pair fired single after single onto the charts, while across the Atlantic, their songs were stirring the attention of British listeners as well. One of the best was "When Will Better Come," an anthemic reminder to Manley that Jamaica was still waiting for him to deliver on the better times he'd promised. There were lighter hearted moments as well, like "Fun and Games," the nursery rhyme of a counting game c*m religious instruction of "Auntie Lulu," and the apocalyptic sounding meeting with a comely girl on "Pretty Fe True." The seminal "Curley Locks arrived in 1974, a song that arguably best illustrates Byles' shimmering talent. Addressed by a young rasta to a girl with a very disapproving father, the singer delivers the lyrics with the perfect touch of plaintiveness, whilst never descending into pitifulness. He may love her, but he won't sacrifice his beliefs for her and although that remains unstated, that touch of fatalistic strength is the core of the song: If she walks away, so be it, adding even more poignancy to the song. Perry's muted arrangement and production adds heavily to the evocative mood. The producer was renowned for riding roughshod over his artists, and he often sacrificed both the song and the singer for the sake of his production. But Byles consistently brought out his best, and all of Perry's work with the singer is notable for its more muted, yet still creative style. His sympathy for the singer's compositions is evident. "Curly Locks" cemented Byles' reputation in Britain, and just added to his chart success in Jamaica.

But behind the scenes, all was not well. Perry was as well-known for his volatility as his creativity and was quick to take offense. Byles was the opposite extreme, renowned for his moodiness, and he alarmingly started falling into paroxysms of deep depression. By 1975, the relationship between the two men had sundered. One of their last sessions together resulted in the "Long Way" single. Although ostensibly a moody love song, with hindsight its lyrics accurately sum up the singer and producer's path together. Byles now moved to the Ja-Man label, run by Dudley Swaby and Leroy Hollett, and immediately knocked out three hits for the team in duet with Rupert Reid -- "Chant Down Babylon," "Know Where You're Going," and "Remember Me," and a fourth, "Pitchy Patchy," solo. It was obvious that regardless of his emotional problems, the singer was more than capable of continuing to cut excellent material. This was affirmed by further successful singles with Lloyd Campbell ("Buy-O-Boy") and Pete Weston. The latter producer oversaw Byles second album, Jordan, which boasted the pair's two big hits, a splendid cover of "Ain't Too Proud to Beg" and a spectacular version of "Oh Carolina," amongst other covers and new material, and was almost the equal of Beat Down Babylon. However, virtually everything Byles released that year was to be overwhelmed by the single "Fade Away." Produced by JoJo Hookims, this powerful dread single was a smash not just in Jamaica, but in the Britain as well, where it hit with the strength of a nuclear blast. The singer seemed unstoppable. He was one of Jamaica's biggest stars and had also established a massive following in Britain, an international breakthrough now seemed imminent.

But then, on August 27, 1975, Haile Selassie died. Obviously, all devoted Rastafarians were deeply affected by his death, but Byles, already emotionally fragile, couldn't cope. He attempted suicide, but thankfully didn't succeed and he was taken to Bellevue Hospital. He was released soon after, but wasn't really recovered. Over the next few years, Byles continued to attempt to work, but proved to be able to for only brief periods of time. Having poured singles down on the island like rain, the singer's output slowed down to a few releases a year. He managed to cut only a couple of tracks in 1976, overseen by Holness, a cover of Delroy Wilson's classic "Run Run" and a new version of "King of Babylon." The following year, he rejoined Lloyd Campbell and recorded "Can You Feel It" and "Weeping," a song whose lyrics reflected Byles' own emotional state. The singer also linked with DJ Big Youth for a version of the Archies' "Sugar Sugar (utilizing the rhythm from the Mighty Diamonds' "Right Time"). In 1978, he reunited with his first producer, Joe Gibbs, now working in conjunction with Errol Thompson as the Mighty Two, and cut another pair of singles -- "Dreadlocks Time" and "Heart and Soul." Every single one of these songs was masterful and each was a hit, but that didn't change the fact that the singer's life was in shambles and his career equally so. In between these sparse recording sessions, Byles retired to the quiet of the hills or back into the hospital. The sessions with the Mighty Two were to be the last for four years, and the singer disappeared entirely from the music scene. In 1982, Byles returned determined to relaunch his career. He began recording a new album with producer Black Morwell for Bullwackies, it would not be ready for release until 1986. In the interim, the singer's life took further turns for the worse. He and his mother were close, and he was devastated by her death during this period. They say tragedies strike in threes, and this was followed by the loss of his house in a fire; adding to his misery, his wife and two children left Jamaica and emigrated to the U.S. During this sad time, Morwell released two new Byles' singles, "Better Be Careful and "Don't Be Surprised," while the singer also cut "Dance Hall" for Winston Riley. Finally, his new album was released, but after the sheer brilliance of his last two, Rasta No Pickpocket was a disappointment. The title-track was a re-recording of an old single cut back in his days with Perry, and while there were still flashes of genius within, the overwhelming aura of the album is one of talent slipping away. Horrifically, by late 1987, the singer was homeless, penniless, and virtually unrecognizable.

Two years later, Holness took Byles back into the studio and recorded a new single, the superb "Young Girl." In 1992, the pair reunited again and cut the equally good "Little Fleego." After each release, the singer again faded into oblivion. Five years later, Byles took the stage with guitarist Earl "Chinna" Smith for a small number of Jamaican shows over 1997 and 1998. Since then, Byles has slipped from view once again. Even with these vast gaps between releases, Byles has not been forgotten, something the burgeoning reissue market has expertly seen to. The singer, both on his own and with the Versatiles, appears on numerous various artists and producer compilations, while the Trojan label has ensured that much of his work with Perry remains available. In response to his live appearances, the Heartbeat label has also released Curly Locks: The Best Of, an excellent compilation of the singer's work. ~ Jo-Ann Greene
full bio

Selected Discography

x

Track List: The Sound Doctor

1. Oppression

2. Army Of Love

3. Wam-Pam-Pa-Do

4. Sound Doctor

5. Doctor Skank

7. Do Good

8. Different Experience

9. Smiling Faces

11. Be Prepared

13. Key Card

14. Domino Game

15. Message To The Nation

16. Dub Message

17. Water Your Garden

18. Standing On The Hill

19. Start Over

20. Its Impossible

21. Grandfather Land

22. King Of Kings

23. King Of Kings Version

x

Track List: Niney The Observer: Roots With Quality

Disc 1

1. Blood & Fire

2. Whole Lot Of Fire

5. Rascal Man (False Rasta)

6. Rasta No Born Yah

7. Guess Who's Coming To Dinner/Clap The Barber

8. Way To Reason

9. Bring The Couchie Come

10. I Need Your Loving

11. Rock On

12. Silver Words

13. My Baby Is Gone

14. Here I Come

15. Jah Come Here

16. Warrior

18. Every Natty

19. Weeping

20. Sufferation

Disc 2

2. Slave Master/Captives

3. Chant It Down

4. Jah Is My Light

5. No More Will I Roam [Extended]

6. Materialist

8. Prophecy Call

10. I Jah I

11. Slave Call

12. Temptation, Botheration & Tribulation

14. Tease My Love

15. Lover's Race

16. Mr. Sun

17. Thank You Mama

18. Lover's Rock J.A. Style

19. Sweets For My Sweet

x

Track List: Jonny Greenwood Is The Controller

1. Dread Are The Controller

2. Let Me Down Easy

5. Bionic Rats

6. Cool Rasta

7. Flash Gordon Meets Luke Skywalker

9. Fever

11. Dread Dub

12. Gypsy Man

13. A Ruffer Version

14. Right Road To Dubland

15. Dreader Locks

16. This Life Makes Me Wonder

17. Clean Race

x

Track List: I Am The Upsetter (Box)

Disc 1

7. Return Of Django

8. Check Him Out

11. Rightful Ruler

13. Medical Operation

17. Duppy Conqueror

18. Don't Let The Sun Catch You Crying

20. Place Called Africa

23. Beat Down Babylon

Disc 2

1. Public Enemy Number One

3. Hot & Cold

10. Black Ipa

11. Jungle Lion

14. Dub Organiser

19. Herb Vendor

21. Curly Locks

Disc 3

1. Bury The Razor

6. Ital Corner

9. I Was Appointed

10. Groovy Situation

13. Sons Of Slaves

Disc 4

4. Black Panta

18. Vampire

x

Track List: All Shook Up - A Reggae Tribute To The King

x

Track List: Blood & Fire: Hit Sounds From The Observer Station (1970-78)

Disc 1

1. Blood & Fire

5. Beg In The Gutter

6. Rasta Band Wagon

10. Can't Enter Zion

14. Silver Words

15. Mr Finnegan

16. Rasta No Born Yah

17. Westbound Train

20. Cassandra

22. Bring The Couchie Come

23. Leggo The Wrong

Disc 2

2. I Man A African

5. Half Way Up The Stairs

6. Guess Who's Coming To Dinner

8. Flat Foot Hustling

9. I Heart Is Clean

10. Travelling Man

12. Nebuchadnezzar

13. Clap The Barber

14. Wolf And Leopard

15. Materialist

16. Train To Skaville 77

17. One Trainload Of Collie

18. Here I Come

19. Slave Master

21. Lovers Rock Ja. Style

22. Weeping

23. Mr Do Over Man Song

24. Follow This Ya Sound

x

Track List: Furry Selection: Luxury Cuts Of Trojan Chosen By A Super Furry Animal

1. Skylarking

2. Curly Locks

3. Dread Combination

6. Darkest Night On A Wet Looking Road

8. Penny For Your Dub

9. Do It Baby

11. Free The Weed

12. Kaya

14. The Long Way

x

Track List: History Of Trojan Records: 1972-1995, Vol. 2

Disc 1

4. Festival Da Da

6. Keep On Moving

7. All That We Need Is Love

8. S90 Skank

9. The Time Has Come

12. Money In My Pocket

14. Loving Pauper

16. African Queen

17. Words Of My Mouth

18. Purify Your Heart

21. John Devour

24. Everything I Own

25. Help Me Make It Through The Night

Disc 2

1. Fire Burning

2. Sweet Bitter Love

3. Stalag 17

4. Here I Am Baby

5. None Shall Escape The Judgement

6. Ire Feelings

7. Play De Music

8. Forward Jah Jah Children

9. Jah Jah Bless The Dreadlocks

10. Hurt So Good

12. Duke Of Earl Dub

13. Soldering

14. Keep Cool Babylon

17. Ram Goat Liver

18. Heavy Manners

20. The People Got To Know

21. Love The Dread

23. You Are The Sun

x

Track List: Micron Music Presents: Every Mouth Must Be Fed 1973-1976

1. Conference At Waterhouse

2. Conference Version

3. Lorna Banana

4. Revolution Is For The Chinaman

5. Straight To Scratch Head

6. Message From The Top

9. The Right To Live

10. Tribute To Muhammad Ali

11. Wages Of Crime

12. Wages Of Crime Version

13. Ska Baby

14. Ska Version Instrumental

15. Every Mouth Must Be Fed

16. Ain't Too Proud To Beg

17. Last Of The Love Songs

19. Mad Mad Hatter

20. Mad Mad Horn

x

Track List: Rockers: Original Sountrack

1. We 'A' Rockers

3. Police And Thieves

4. Book Of Rules

5. Stepping Razor

7. Fade Away

9. Slave Master

10. Dread Lion

11. Graduation In Zion

12. Jah No Dead

14. Natty Take Over

x

Track List: This Is Reggae Music - The Golden Era 1960 - 1975

Disc 1

1. Iron Bar

2. Fat Man

3. Rough And Tough

5. My Boy Lollipop

6. Penny Reel-O

7. Phoenix City

10. Rudy Got Soul

11. Down By The Train Line

12. Cry Tough

13. 007 (Shanty Town)

15. The Loser

16. Train To Skaville

17. Ba Ba Boom

18. Stop That Train

21. True, True, True

22. Israelites

23. 54-46 That's My Number

24. Everything Crash

Disc 2

1. Do The Reggay

3. Engine 54

5. Cuss Cuss

7. Tighten Up

8. Return Of Django

9. Shocks Of Mighty

10. Monkey Man

12. Ride Your Donkey

13. Red, Red Wine

14. Wonderful World, Beautiful People

15. Pressure Drop

16. Don't Let Me Suffer

17. Rivers Of Babylon

18. Liquidator

19. Johnny Too Bad

21. Double Barrel

22. Many Rivers To Cross

Disc 3

1. You Can Get It If You Really Want

2. Montego Bay

3. Come Into My Life

5. Blood And Fire

6. 400 Years

7. Duppy Conqueror

8. Vietnam

9. Singer Man

12. Small Axe

13. Pomps And Pride

14. Bongo Man

15. Let Your Yeah Be Yeah

16. Guava Jelly

17. Black And White

18. I Feel Good All Over

19. Hypocrite

20. Stick By Me (And I'll Stick By You)

21. Cherry Oh Baby

22. African Herbsman

Disc 4

1. Better Must Come

3. A Place Called Africa

4. Trenchtown Rock

6. I Can See Clearly Now

7. This Is Reggae Music

8. Brand New Second Hand

9. Lively Up Yourself

10. Stir It Up

11. Money In My Pocket

12. Funky Kingston

13. The Time Has Come

14. Everything I Own

15. Westbound Train

18. S90 Skank

19. Black Man Time

20. Bad Da

x

Track List: Total Reggae: Roots

1. Fisherman

2. True Rastaman

3. Warrior

4. Hard Time Pressure

5. Black Liberation

6. Burn Babylon

7. Two Sevens Clash

8. None A Jah Jah Children

9. Border

10. Vinyard

11. Natural Mystic (Original Mix)

12. Bits Of Paper

13. Fade Away

14. Never Stop Fighting

15. Ballistic Affair

16. Things And Time

17. Gates Of Zion

20. Fire Burning

21. Joggin'

22. Ina Jah Children

24. Devil's Throne

25. Carpenter Rebuild

26. Tribal War

27. Call Of The Rastaman

28. Far East

29. Praise Him

30. Jack Slick

31. Trials And Crosses

32. Fools Fighting

33. Torch Of Freedom

34. I Spy

36. Place In Africa (Addis Ababa)

37. Hypocrite

38. Here Comes The Judge

39. It's A Good Day

40. Stepping Out Of Babylon

x

Track List: Trojan Reggae: Ska, Rocksteady And Reggae Classics, 1967-1974

1. Liquidator

2. Johnny Too Bad

3. Stick By Me (And I'll Stick By You)

4. Westbound Train

5. Ba Ba Boom

6. Double Barrel

7. Soul Shakedown Party

8. I Second That Emotion

9. You Can Get It If You Really Want

10. A Place Called Africa

11. Pressure Drop

12. Rivers Of Babylon

13. Ain't No Sunshine

14. Red, Red Wine

15. Long Shot Kick De Bucket

16. I Am The Upsetter

17. Return Of Django

18. Hot & Cold

x

Track List: United Dreadlocks Vol. 2

1. Close To Me

2. The Creator Aka Creator

3. Vineyard

4. Why Birds Follow Spring Aka Wise Birds

5. Memories By The Score

6. Hooligan

8. Set Up Yourself

9. Heart And Soul

10. My Man

Comments

Report as inappropriate
I knew Junior Byles - spinning 45s right from yard back in the day
Report as inappropriate
It's a shame a legend like junior Byles is a virtual unknown to pandora
Report as inappropriate
discovered J Byles through a compilation that the bassist from The Super Furry Animals put together. Sick stuff.
Report as inappropriate
Jah B is amazing but most people that aren't really intensely into reggae have never heard of him, he was as he puts it out in the cold for 27 years, he got fed up and didnt record or perform for 27 years, he's amazing

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