It is taking longer than expected to fetch the next song to play. The music should be playing soon. If you get tired of waiting, you can try reloading your browser.


Please check our Help page for information about troubleshooting Pandora on your browser.

Please ensure you are using the latest Flash Player.


If you are unable or do not wish to upgrade your Flash Player,
please try a different browser.


Please check our Help page for information about troubleshooting Pandora on your browser.
Your Pandora One subscription will expire shortly.
More Info
No Thanks
Your Pandora One trial will expire shortly.
Restore
Close
close
Your Pandora One trial subscription will expire shortly. Upgrade to continue unlimited, ad-free listening.
Upgrade Now
You've listened to hours of Pandora this month. Consider upgrading to Pandora One.
More Info
No Thanks
Close
Hi . Pandora is using Facebook to personalize your experience. Learn MoreNo Thanks
-0:00
0:00
Change Skin

We created Pandora to put the Music Genome Project directly in your hands

It’s a new kind of radio –
stations that play only music you like

 
Create an account for free. Register
Now Playing
Music Feed
My Profile
Create a Station
People who also like this

Pedro J. Gonzalez & Los Madrugadores

Pedro J. Gonzalez had an important role in Mexican-American music of the twentieth century, as both a performer and, to a greater extent, a popularizer of the style. His greatest musical accomplishment was founding Los Madrugadores, which with various personnel recorded constantly during the 1930s, becoming one of the most popular Mexican-American recording acts of the period. He was also a pioneer of Spanish-language radio broadcasting in the United States, although his influence in that area was curtailed by his controversial imprisonment in the mid-1930s.

Gonzalez, born in the Mexican village of Chihuahua in the mid-1890s, moved to Texas in 1917, after the Mexican Revolution. According to a legend recounted in the liner notes to Arhoolie's Los Madrugadores compilation 1931-1937, he was nearly shot by a firing squad while still in Mexico, but had his life saved when Maria Solcido and other school children stood in front of him, stopping the execution; Solcido became his wife. In 1923, the Gonzalezes moved to Los Angeles, and in 1929 Pedro began one of the first Spanish-language programs on the West Coast, on KMPC. Gonzalez could also sing, and in 1930 he was making his first recordings.

In 1931 Gonzalez joined forces with singer-guitarists Jesus and Victor Sanchez, subsequently augmented by singer Fernando Linares. This was the group that Gonzalez named Los Madrugadores, who recorded both traditional Mexican songs and contemporary compositions in the same style throughout the 1930s. While Gonzalez sometimes sang with musicians from Los Madrugadores on singles, many of the discs did not benefit from his participation. Los Madrugadores were more a floating group of Mexican-American musicians and singers than they were a permanent lineup, and various releases appeared under their name that featured different combinations of individuals, including the Sanchez brothers, Linares, Narciso Farfan, Crescencio Cuevas, and Josefina Caldera. Los Madrugadores' records had close harmonies, accomplished guitar playing, and emotive delivery, and were among the most popular Mexican-American releases of the time.

In 1934, Gonzalez was sentenced to one-to-fifty years in San Quentin prison on rape charges. The woman he was accused of raping subsequently admitted that she had been coerced into lying under oath, but this revelation was not admitted as new evidence, and Gonzales ended up serving six years. Gonzales had used his radio program to advocate social justice for Spanish speakers in Southern California, and to protest the deportation of hundreds of thousands of such people from the United States, and it has been speculated that there was political motivation behind his persecution. While in San Quentin, Gonzales continued to mobilize for justice, organizing hunger strikes and other acts of civil disobedience to improve conditions in the prison.

Gonzales was paroled in 1940, after protests and appeals from two Mexican presidents, but deported to Mexico. He lived in Tijuana for 30 years and resumed radio broadcasting on XEAU, as well as forming a different edition of Los Madrugadores, which recorded under the name. He came back to the US in 1970, and was the subject of a 1983 KPBS documentary, Ballad of an Unsung Hero, which later provided the material for the movie Break of Dawn. He died at the age of 99 in 1995. ~ Richie Unterberger
full bio

Comments

Report as inappropriate
Great old tunes
Report as inappropriate
atrejo553
Excelente music, rare songs.

We're sorry, but a browser plugin or firewall may be preventing Pandora from loading.

In order to use Pandora internet radio, please upgrade to a more current browser.

Please check our Help page for more information.

It looks like your browser does not support modern SSL/TLS. Please upgrade your browser.

If you need help, please email: pandora-support@pandora.com.

In order to use Pandora internet radio, please upgrade to a more current browser
or install a newer version of Flash (v.10 or later).

In order to use Pandora internet radio, please install Adobe Flash (v.10 or later).

[97, 79, 95, 93, 108, 65, 108, 96, 69, 65, 78, 64, 126, 97, 112, 82, 123, 117, 106, 122, 76, 99, 122, 79, 111, 101, 126, 88, 86, 108, 103, 87, 90, 82, 114, 113, 110, 108, 116, 73, 118, 106, 81, 122, 82, 84, 72, 107, 110, 127, 80, 109, 76, 125, 105, 109, 99, 77, 74, 107, 122, 121, 71, 113, 107, 123, 118, 113, 122, 120, 108, 112, 68, 87, 82, 103, 126, 124, 86, 67, 98, 107, 87, 96, 88, 111, 75, 108, 85, 89, 112, 114, 85, 71, 106, 70, 126, 116, 87, 82, 84, 83, 126, 104, 117, 99, 101, 102, 99, 114, 99, 99, 95, 111, 74, 111, 80, 71, 66, 65, 116, 102, 92, 75, 126, 114, 75, 100, 84, 68, 69, 115, 88, 106, 113, 83, 98, 125, 91, 100, 83, 120, 104, 72, 72, 100, 105, 111, 73, 106, 71, 95, 104, 103, 64, 74, 72, 83, 101, 121, 123, 127, 77, 95, 82, 86, 108, 71, 96, 85, 77, 107, 87, 74, 99, 68, 75, 80, 121, 112, 124, 80, 84, 100, 91, 117, 72, 114, 76, 118, 111, 115, 124, 75, 92, 64, 76, 79, 69, 117, 113, 125, 124, 119, 68, 95, 119, 127, 96, 83, 117, 70, 70, 91, 87, 90, 90, 119, 65, 99, 74, 82, 103, 84, 117, 106, 116, 92, 72, 87, 106, 105, 94, 124, 68, 82, 116, 71, 108, 74, 122, 106, 77, 104, 98, 117, 83, 110, 110, 122, 76, 121, 78, 113, 86, 99, 107, 83, 120, 69, 127, 111, 66, 86, 88, 87, 94, 117, 85, 124, 64, 86, 72, 85, 83, 80, 113, 77, 83, 108, 76, 97, 73, 102, 106, 88, 101, 85, 124, 82, 123, 77, 64, 122, 114, 124, 64, 74, 117, 107, 95, 79, 80, 118, 99, 79, 108, 117, 123, 71, 74, 123, 67, 66, 82, 124, 111, 89, 118, 78, 89, 125, 100, 114, 82, 119, 100, 83, 123, 122, 87, 66, 87, 71, 86, 71, 80, 106, 111, 72, 64, 95, 127, 95, 120, 91, 105, 109, 69, 107, 64, 93, 87, 99, 74, 77, 68, 94, 100, 82, 108, 77, 98, 113, 124, 93, 65, 105, 118, 124, 77, 70, 66, 121, 104, 113, 103, 122, 119, 72, 119, 112, 116, 81, 68, 92, 116, 118, 116, 90, 125, 65, 117, 76, 92, 88, 71, 103, 93, 88, 87, 115, 99, 79, 94, 90, 87, 106, 109, 117, 126, 95, 102, 118, 105, 72, 97, 76, 70, 114, 71, 103, 123, 96, 97, 91, 77, 116, 80, 100, 88, 85, 72, 124, 88, 84, 94, 96, 80, 90, 94, 87, 95, 106, 115, 105, 74, 82, 83, 77, 82, 78, 88, 71, 99, 91, 91, 67, 117, 99, 66, 121, 86, 117, 112, 72, 98, 74, 91, 84, 110, 116, 91, 100, 79, 94, 64, 72, 79, 88, 124, 71, 94, 71, 90, 94, 79, 85, 66, 83, 70, 99, 124, 70, 101, 120, 123, 106, 91, 112, 90, 65, 126, 73, 122, 72, 95, 121, 119, 70, 123, 80]